21 Step Process

21 Step Process

Preparing The Leather

The key to a great meal is great ingredients…belts are no different. We start with full sides of the finest vegetable-tanned leather we can find. The tradition of vegetable-tanning dates back to before the Renaissance. It consists of using natural tannins extracted from plants and trees to dye the leather.

The main ingredient in the vegetable leather tanning process is time. It takes about 40 days to transform raw hides into unique and durable vegetable tanned leather.  This process is natural, environmentally friendly and it creates leather
that maintains its beauty and luster.

Leather created by this process is 3 times more durable and valuable than its chromium counterpart.

Saddle leather is an expensive byproduct of the American beef business. It is easy to spot American hides because they typically run 3-4 square feet larger than South American hides by comparison.

Cutting & Trimming

Bevelling The Straps

This beveller takes 4 tiny edges off of the strap with one pull. This subtle step is the difference between a strap and a belt.

Skiving

The leather must be “thinned” down at the buckle end. This allows for a more comfortable fit.

The Skiving Process takes 20% of the lower side off.
This allows the buckle to be properly positioned.
We start just before the second hole for full strength.

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Creating The Holes & Finishing The Edges

  • This machine puts perfectly even holes in every time.

  • Hand beveling tools from Sheridan, Wyoming.

The Edge Sealing Process

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Second
Edge
Process

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Final
Edge
Process

We use Italian edge dye. It has polymers that fill and smooth the edges without flaking.

We use permanent dye that won't crack or flake off.

There is no substitute for heavy canvas, saddle soap, and good old fashioned elbow grease.

The Second Edge Process is with gum tragacanth. This is a natural plant based edge smoothing agent.

The Final Edge Process is with an alpha hydroxy product. This lowers the pH and although expensive, offers the best final edge in leatherwork.

"There is no substitute for saddle soap, heavy tent canvas, and good old fashioned elbow grease."

Stitching

"Germany produces the finest industrial sewing machines in the world. Our machine defines stitches with unparalleled quality."

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29th step
30th step

Our Thread

The thread we use is for saddles and parachutes.  It is made very strong for years of durability.

Making the Loops

The loop that holds back the belt end has to be cut, dyed, beveled, smoothed, stapled, stitched and molded as well.

A handmade Amish loop blocker.  Used to square up and define the loop edges.

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The Final Touch

This electric hide brander brands AZBELT.COM onto every belt.

  • The Electric Hide Brander

  • A Freshly Branded AZBELT

Front loops

Front loops are being sewn closer to the snap on men’s jeans these days.
To accommodate for this, we have moved the loop closer to the buckle for a better fit.

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